Floral-194
Welcome to the memorial page for

Shizuko "Suzy" (Nagano) Young

November 25, 1929 ~ July 18, 2017 (age 87)

Shizuko Young from Evansville (formerly of Princeton, Oakland City and her native Japan) left this world on July 18, 2017, eighty-seven years after gracing us with her presence. She left in peace, having spent the early morning hours celebrating three of her passions, gardening, floral arranging, and taking care of her dog, Ollie.

She is joining her parents, Katsumi and Take Nagano, her husband (Carl Young), and her dog Tuton, aka. “Chu-Chi”. She left behind four children, Loretta Young Heidorn (Bob) of Evansville, Judy Hundt (Tim) of Huntley, IL, Midori Simmons (Ivan Jr.) of Princeton and Robert Young (Jimi Sue) of Princeton; 7 grandchildren, John Richards, Reece Collins (Sarah), Audrey Marshall (J.R.), Olivia Pinkston (Brent), Amy Kerr, Traci Wilson (Fred) and Valerie Brimm (Laron); 12 great grandchildren; and her beloved sisters, Chiseko Miyoshi of Japan, Machiko Nguyen of France and Yumiko Okamato of Japan, and her constant, loyal companion, her dog, Ollie.

Visitation will be held from 1:00 to 4:00 on Sunday, July 30, 2017 at Colvin Funeral Home at 425 N. Main St. in Princeton, immediately followed with a memorial service at 4:00, with Pastor Brad Keenan officiating.

Memorial Contributions may be made to the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), families of America’s fallen heroes. Envelopes will be available at the funeral home or you can give online at https://www.taps.org/donate . You may also leave a message of sympathy or light a memorial candle at www.colvinfuneralhome.com.

Shizuko was an amazing person. Hidden within her tiny frame lived an invincible, boundless soul. She was a fighter with spirit who survived, as a child, the loss of her father and homeland to Russia; as a teen, a decade fight with tuberculosis; as a young woman, the death of her husband, and successfully raised four children alone, as a single mother, in a country not originally her own.

Shizuko lived joyfully and in gratitude, so most never knew her story and struggle. After her husband died, she buckled down, learned how to read and write in English, studied US government and history and earned her US citizenship. She worked multiple jobs to keep food on the table, and eventually got a position as an assembler at Potter and Brumfield (Siemens) in Princeton. She was a hard worker who enjoyed making her co-workers laugh and feeding them Japanese food. After Potter and Brumfield closed, Shizuko retired, but she still enjoyed cooking for people at Toyota and Nagasaki Inn.

She lived her clear set of values and beliefs, every day. She taught you need to make every action count, as she said, “God is always watching.” She was kind and gave generously. Even when she had nothing to give, she’d give you her share of food. She said you don’t have to worry about giving all you have, as God takes care of those who take care of others.

She taught your word must mean something. Her “yes” was her “yes” and her “no” was her “no”, and you could count on it. She may not always tell you what you wanted to hear, but she certainly shared what you needed to hear. She expected you to always do your best, be the best you can be. Everyone around her learned and grew into better people, because she challenged all to see the potential she saw in them.

Shizuko could conquer anything. She was larger than any problem, as she would just say “pppphhhuuuhhh” to the challenge, hunker down and figure out what to do next. She fought for those she loved, and shielded others from the battle with her smile and famous “yoshi-yoshi”.

Shizuko appreciated every moment and all the small things, every flower, bird, butterfly, song and, of course, a good piece of fish. She was active, someone who sang, danced, fished, sewed, and loved to beat you in a good game of rummy. She never stopped learning and growing, taking up golf in her late sixties. She laughed more loudly than most and played games with the excitement of a child. Run, sweet child, back into the arms of God and your dear mother. You have so earned your rest. We miss you already.


Charitable donations may be made to:

Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), families of America's fallen heros
Web: http://www.taps.org/donate



 Service Information

Visitation
Sunday
July 30, 2017

1:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Colvin Funeral Home
425 North Main Street
Princeton, IN 47670

Memorial Service
Sunday
July 30, 2017

4:00 PM
Colvin Funeral Home
425 North Main Street
Princeton, IN 47670


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